Thursday, November 27, 2014

Gram Mattered

Lorene Fulp Wall May 13, 1921----November 17, 2014


Last Saturday we celebrated the life of Lorene Fulp Wall, my Mother-in-law. It was a sad time, but somehow a joyous time.

This photo was taken at her ninety (90) birthday celebration. How many of us would like to look like that at ninety? It was difficult for her to let us take care of the celebration because that was always her job.

As a child, the next to youngest of eight children, she was often cared for by older siblings. That roll reversed later in her life as she became the one who looked after them. Each birthday she would have the siblings to her house to celebrate. This included her own birthday. You can see why it was hard for her to let someone else do the job.

The last three years of her life Gram was a victim of Alzheimer's disease.

While Gram lived in a Memory care unit, my brother-in-law, Ed and his wife Janice were her care givers. My sister-in-law, Janice talked about how much Gram taught her during the last three years of Gram's life. Janice spent many hours talking to her about her family, showing her photos and trying to keep her connected. To them we own a special thanks.

Our son, G. Lee reminisced about Gram from the grand children's perspective. Some of his earliest memories are about the times we spent at the Blue Marlin Motel in Atlantic Beach, NC. Gram and Papa owned and operated this Mom & Pop motel. Many years, at Thanksgiving, the motel was opened to family, that included extended family as well. The living quarters were small, the kitchen even smaller. How did she create a Thanksgiving meal for so many people? She was Gram, she could do anything.

Lee talks about the weekends in the Spring when family would visit Gram for the purpose of doing some of the harder yard work. He says, "Being the strong woman and avid Gardner she was, Gram would always insist upon getting her hands dirty. I can assure you that I had put in a backbreaking day of work so as not to be out worked by a Grandma. The key was to wait until she went inside to check on dinner, then work for another 20 minutes or so then I could lay off for the day with a reasonable degree of confidence that my Grandma had not got the better if me."

I've already mentioned Gram's prowess in the kitchen, Gram liked to feed people. You never left her house hungry or empty handed.

Lee says, " my favorite thing about Gram was that I never felt like she judged me, but I cared what she thought about me. I knew she liked, accepted, and loved me for who I am. She treated everyone that way."

"By the way, I think Gram was a very lucky woman, because she was important and needed in this world by so many. To her children, and to her many grandchildren and great grandchildren, Gram mattered. I feel Gram had an amazing, enviable, and long life. I am sure that Gram felt blessed and fulfilled to have mattered so much to so many."

A great tribute to a great woman, she will be missed.

This post is linked to: www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com

Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Friday, November 14, 2014

What Happens when Everything Goes Wrong

My Sunday morning began well. We had a leisurely breakfast and watched our favorite Sunday Morning program. I put a pork roast in the crock pot. Looked up a recipe on line for Parmesan orzo with peas. Had everything I needed except the peas, so I decided that I would take a quick run to the grocery.

Got to the car inserted the key and it wouldn't turn, I tried to move the gear a little still no start. Walked back to the house and told my husband, "the car won't start". He came out and put the key back in and it started. OK, I'm famous for mechanical or technical failures, so I don't think too much about this.




I had decided that while I am out I will swing by a beautiful old oak tree in its Autumn splendor, and take a photo. I get one shot, and then try another view, but the camera won't work. Mind you, I had just charged the battery.
I turned it off and on, took the battery out, cleaned the connectors, still doesn't work. The lens is out and will not retract. OK, so much for photos today I tell myself. Off to the grocery to buy a single bag of peas. At least that went well.

After I returned home, I decided that I would work on a piece that I had been procrastinating on starting the quilting. I always have such a hard time at this stage of my work. Since my record with mechanical things this morning, had not been exactly good, I was hesitant to start using my machine. However, I was in the mood to sew so I decided I would do a little meandering. After a couple of inches the thread shredding in the top. I rethreaded, etc. and it happened again and again and again, I changed bobbin thread, I changed the needle, I cleaned the bobbin case, I changed the top thread. It still shredded. I'm talking a couple of hours working on this problem. Finally I give up.

OK, the day is not lost, at least I can make the Parmesan Orzo Pea recipe. The pork looks and smells good. I whip up a nice green salad to accompany the meal. Hubby doesn't like the pork or the orzo. It has just not been my day.
This post is linked to www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com

- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Friday, November 7, 2014

Fiber Artist, Gwendolyn Ann McGee

I recently had the privilege to view a fiber art exhibit at UNCG, Greencboro, NC. This exhibit is perhaps the most moving art exhibit I have ever witnesses. The title is Lift Every Voice and Sing: The Quilts of Gwendolyn Ann McGee.





LiftEvery Voice and Sing, 2004
41.5" x 53"

My writing is not eloquent enough to express the feelings that one has when viewing the following pieces of art. I will post the photos, some of which I have to comment on, and other pieces with just the title.






Southern Heritage, Southern Shame
22.5 x 32.5















Full of Faith 41.5 x 53
This is one of the pieces that really threw me. As I looked at it, and studied the choice of fabrics, and the design of the background, my thoughts where "that looks like hell". I expressed that comment to my SIL, and she said, "well".

















Bitter the Chastening Rod. 43.75" x 39"
It may be hard to tell that the dark shadow begins at her mouth. To me it show the pain, and agony suffered by this pregnant woman as she is beaten.












Blood of the Slaughtered I and II. 70" x 85"
This is by far the most powerful piece in the exhibit. The background is printed with old newspaper article that appeared in a Southern paper. It also has a list by state of people who were slaughtered in the name of the law. I began reading one of the articles and could not finish in. This is a powerful piece.

My apologies for procrastinating in getting this posted, Nov.8th is the last day of the exhibit.
This post is linked to :
www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com

Fiber Artist, Gwendolyn Ann McGee

I recently had the privilege to view a fiber art exhibit at UNCG, Greencboro, NC. This exhibit is perhaps the most moving art exhibit I have ever witnesses. The title is Lift Every Voice and Sing: The Quilts of Gwendolyn Ann McGee.


LiftEvery Voice and Sing, 2004
41.5" x 53"

My writing is not eloquent enough to express the feelings that one has when viewing the following pieces of art. I will post the photos, some of which I have to comment on, and other pieces with just the title.



Southern Heritage, Southern Shame
22.5 x 32.5


Full of Faith 41.5 x 53
This is one of the pieces that really threw me. As I looked at it, and studied the choice of fabrics, and the design of the background, my thoughts where "that looks like hell". I expressed that comment to my SIL, and she said, "well".



Bitter the Chastening Rod. 43.75" x 39"
It may be hard to tell that the dark shadow begins at her mouth. To me it show the pain, and agony suffered by this pregnant woman as she is beaten.




Blood of the Slaughtered I and II. 70" x 85"
This is by far the most powerful piece in the exhibit. The background is printed with old newspaper article that appeared in a Southern paper. It also has a list by state of people who were slaughtered in the name of the law. I began reading one of the articles and could not finish in. This is a powerful piece.

If you are anywhere near Greensboro, NC, I would recommend a visit to this exhibit. Unfortunately I procrastinated getting this posted, Nov.8th is the last day of the exhibit.



Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Thread Heads Exhibit at the World of Energy

Fiber art group, the Thread Heads of Seneca, SC took on the challenge "Native" as the main theme for their fourth exhibit at The World of Energy. The pieces take us from Hawaii to the. Trail of Tears. Each piece telling a compelling story.





































Jean Wachs "Trail of Tears"







































Bonnie Ouellette tells a folk tale in her piece about Hawaii





































Carolyn Harris tells this interesting story. Carolyn first read this story in Guidepost Magazine. She found it difficult to get the story our of her mind.









close-up of the story Carolyn used for her inspiration.































Carolyn's rendition of the wall.













































































Heidi Wolko

























Paula Ridley







































Ronette Askew















































I wish I had more information about how each member was inspired to create their individual piece, and enough room to show each piece. However, you can experience this exhibit at the World of Energy, Seneca, SC through Nov. 4th. 10-5.



This post is linked to www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com

Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Monday, October 27, 2014

Beautiful Shebori from China







My friend Sarah Miller works in China. This past week Sarah and her husband were doing a little touring and came to the village of Xizhu. Here she saw this woman stitching some amazing designs in fabric. Below is Sarah's comments.

Marilyn, this whole region is one you would love...such beautiful faces, such interesting traditions and yes, I thought of you when I saw the tie-die. They actually do a type of silk screen procedure to get the pattern on the cotton, then they stitch it up to get the exact designs, then they dip the whole thing 22 times in the home-made indigo die, letting it dry each time, then they undo the stitching to let the design unfold. It is really very interesting!






This is a piece that Sarah purchased. I believe that this process is actually called shebori, although Sarah's said her guide used the term tie-dye. How beautiful is this?

Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Monday, October 13, 2014

Round the World Blog Hop

I have been nominated by Linda Steele to join the Round the World Blog Hop. Linda is a fellow fiber artist who lives in Australia. I have so many wonderful friends, whom I have never met, on the internet. What a wonderful time we live in.

Linda creates the most beautiful hand embroidery on Crazy quilts. You can see her work here www.lindasteelequilts.blogspot.com  She has won awards in Australia, as well as, International show in Houston and Paducah.

The blog hop consist of four questions:

What am I working on?

It's hard for me to work on one thing at a time, so I always have at least two or three works on the design wall. I often get stuck, as with this one, and have to look at it for a while. The shadow is my problem at the moment. When I began creating this piece, of my cute and athletic grand niece, everything meshed. I was on a high from the creating process, but then hit a wall with the shadow. I think I have the problem solved, but haven't had time to get back to work.I have been teaching and traveling a lot this year. Neither is conducive to creating.

I also am working on an architectural piece. I have the fabrics assembled and the pattern somewhat ready.

  I had a few days to spend on a project, but didn't have time to get into something major. I have been working on class prep and really wanted something quick and fun. I took this photo over thirty years ago, and it has always been one of my favorites. So I dug it out and did some work in PS to prepare a pattern. I am very happy with this and ancious to develop it further.

I also have a major quilt working its way through my brain now. It is a Modern Quilt. I have never done anything like this. I really like Modern quilts and hope that I can do it justice.

The idea came while preparing for a class called Drunkards Path and More. This class has so many possibilities. One of the reason I love to teach is that it makes me experiment, and in doing so, I find new ways to create.

How does my work differ from others of its genre?

 I think as artist we all have individual gifts, talents and ideas that make each of our creations unique and different. Therefore even though we may work in the same genre, each piece is different. However, there is an area that I have enjoyed working in that I have not yet seen emerge in the quilt world. My work in computer manipulated art images on quilts has been very exciting and fulfilling as well as unique to the quilting community.
 Ohm 

Ohm, won a second place in the computer category at Houston in 2011.

 Spirit of the Kiva 

Spirit of the Kiva just won Best of Show the Asheville, NC quilt show.

These are both were created with photos of mine that were manipulated and enhanced in PSE.










Why do I do what I do?

This question is probable the easiest to answer. BECAUSE I LOVE IT. 

How does my process work?

While I have always worked with my hands creating, I never considered myself an artist. my husband and I married young, and I worked while he went to college. I was a happy stay-at-home mother. With my husband's job we made many moves. Once we came to a location where we expected to be for a while, I went back to school. I wanted to find out if I could actually learn to be an artist. I believe you can.

My major was photography. My work comes almost solely from photographs that I have taken over the years. I think that many people feel that if you use a photograph as an inspiration, that it is somehow cheating. One needs to remember that the photographer has the eye; first to see the image, second to hone in on the important section, and to know or create, the best lighting conditions.

I love to create and work with my hands. I love beauty, color and texture. I have always been a sewist. Combine these and you have the answer to why I do what I do.

I've been very windy but I hope you have stayed with me. I am going to introduce two artist whose blog I follow.

Virginia (Jenny) Greaves is a talented portrait artist whose blog I started following many years ago. You will find it here www.virginiagreaves.com   Jenny and I have communicated via internet for several years. I was pleased to meet her last year in Houston. Jenny won a well deserved blue ribbon for her portrait of Lincoln. I have it on good authority that is is a winner this year as well.


















LeeAnna Paylor's blog is titled Not Afraid of Color and you can find it here, lapraylor.blogspot.com
It is an  very apply name blog. LeeAnna is funny, talented and generous with her tutorials. Her quilts, as well as her personality, are alive with color.


Jenny and LeeAnna will be posting on Oct. 20. Please check out their blogs.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Teaching

I've been teaching a lot this year and it's been fun. I have a Mini Nature class coming up next Monday in N. Augusta, SC. I've had a lot of request for a bird pattern, so I've been working on creating one. One of the things I like to show my students, is how the background can change the whole mood of a piece.
These are a few of the different backgrounds I tried.











WHICH DO YOU LIKE BEST?

I have been tapped to join the Round the World Blog Hop. My post will be coming out Monday, Oct. 13. Come back and see what I have to say.

This post is linked to www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com
Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Friday, October 3, 2014

A week of R and R




We spent the last week at the coast with family and friends. We always love to go there, it's peaceful and restful. Since it was gray and rainy the whole time, we got lots of rest. It's been hard getting out of that mode into one of accomplishing something. I have a feeling that won't happen today. It's raining here, and we need the rain, but it doesn't exactly fill me with energy.



I don't remember if I posted this portrait yet. I had a short period before we left on vacation to play a little, and I wanted something quick and fun to work with. I usually mat and frame these pieces, but after looking at it on my design wall I've decided on a different approach. I am making a narrow black sash, not sure it's really a sash, to act as a black mat might work within a larger mat.

I have this wonderful black and white fabric and have decided to to use it as the boarder around the portrait. It's the perfect piece to get me excited and working again, even in the rain.
This post is linked to Off the Wall Friday
www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com

Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

Friday, September 26, 2014

Toot-Toot

That's me tooting my own horn this week. I found out yesterday that my art quilt "Spirit of the Kiva" was named Best of Show at the Asheville, NC quilt show.



I'm totally stoked about this. The beautiful quilting was created by Gail Sexton and I share this honor with her.

This is one of those pieces that doesn't photo well, but when you see it in person is quite striking. I hesitate to say that but, I've been told that, by many people so I'm assuming that is not just my opinion.

I loved working on this piece from the beginning of its creation. It began with a photo of a beautiful little Mexican girl. I then created this four-layered fiber portrait.



After photographing the portrait, I downloaded it into PSE. I looked for a compatible image and found one in my files of an Indian Kiva. I then did some manipulation in PSE and came up with the image that I liked, and had it printed on fabric.

I never begin working on a piece with a solid idea. I begin and through trial and error I come up with a final design. This piece was no different. I knew that I wanted to include come petroglyphs, I also wanted to use some Indian symbols. Since I was using the photo of the Kiva, I decided to look up symbols of Kiva steps. I adapted the symbol and drafted a pattern for a foundation pieced block.

My first idea was to place the pieced blocks on all four sides. This turned out to be was to traditional looking to me. I finally decided to add the blocks to two sides. When Gail and I discussed the quilting pattern she decided to quilt the petroglyphs in the sashing. She also use a few of the petroglyth designs in the face of the little girl.

When deciding on the quilt design for the photo enhanced part of the quilt, Gail chose to emphasize the kiva with free motion quilting.

This piece is very personal to me and, I think Gail feels the same way. We both find it so gratifying to have it recognized by this show. Thank you Asheville Quilt Show.

This post is linked to:
www.ninamariesayre.blogspot.com





Posted using BlogPress from my iPad